Tableau Public

Statistics showing Mayweather and Pacquaio's individual form before the big match in May. Hovering over different parts of the graphic prompts boxes to open that show stats for individual fights. Author: Dan Nguyen. (Click on the pic for a detailed interactive view.)
Statistics showing Mayweather and Pacquaio’s individual form before the big match in May. Hovering over different parts of the graphic prompts boxes to open that show stats for individual fights. Author: Dan Nguyen. (Click on the pic to go to the original for a detailed interactive view.)

Free software that turns data into visual stories.

https://public.tableau.com/s/

More examples of interactives built using Tableau:
Dan Nguyen’s gallery
Tableau gallery

 

David McCandless’s Information Is Beautiful

Who Likes Whom in the Middle East, interactive info graphic by David McCandless.
Who Likes Whom in the Middle East, interactive info graphic by David McCandless.

Independent data journalist and information designer David McCandless says his passion is presenting information with a minimum of words.

His site is worth exploring for its adventurous ideas, and the beauty of some of the designs. He emphasises the importance of ‘juicy data’ – in other words, data that’s absolutely accurate. And, he adds, 80 per cent of the work that goes into a great graphic is gathering the data, organising it and checking.

In one or two of the visualisations beautiful design acts to confuse the information a little, I think. But where he gets the balance right he gets it really right.

An interesting one to start with is Who Likes Whom in the Middle East, a visualised network of the complex relationships between the different players in a highly volatile region.

From journalism.co.uk – some of McCandless’s tips for using visual data.

You can find more interactives here. And follow McCandless on Twitter here.

 

The L.A. Times Homicide Report

The Homicide Report (Los Angeles Times).

The Los Angeles Times Homicide Report started in 2007, and records every death deemed by the state coroner and police to be a deliberate killing. The report is an interactive map, blog, and searchable database that compiles information about the name, gender, age, and ethnicity of victims, as well as recording the time and place of each murder. The site’s tagline, ‘A story for every victim’, reflects the way it presents each case; a report of the circumstances of each death, with a photo of the person who died, is detailed in the blog.

http://homicide.latimes.com/